3 posts categorized "Amir Ali Said"

December 10, 2015

BeatTips Founder, Sa'id, Drops New Single "Make It Mean Something;" Announces Album

Sa'id, Author of the Books The BeatTips Manual and The Art of Sampling, Puts Out New Single and is Set to Release Album that Aims to Be "Meaningful" and "Demonstrates What's in his Books"

By G. Ferguson


BROOKLYN, NY — December 9, 2015 — Sa'id (Amir Said), founder of BeatTips, the popular beatmaking and music education website, the independent publishing house Superchamp Books, and author of the books The BeatTips Manual and The Art of Sampling, today announced his new album The Best of Times. The Best of Times, features beats and rhymes entirely by Sa'id, and in addition to being entertaining and thought provoking, it is meant to serve as an example of the ideas, methods, and practices found in his books.


"This album represents one of the best ways for me to further discuss the kind of information and insight that you'll find in both The BeatTips Manual and The Art of Sampling," says Sa'id. "Everything that I do with BeatTips is about continuing the discussion — finding new ways to help expand the beatmaking community at large. But of course, I'm also an artist: I rhyme and I make beats. So also it means a lot to me that have this opportunity to put out music on my own terms and watch it compete on the open market. Plus, I'm an advocate for beatmakers (producers) putting out their own projects. Whether it be as beatmaker-rappers or as part of duo or group, I believe that the most sustainable path for beatmakers (producers) is the path that includes creating and putting their own projects, rather than chasing or waiting for a beat placement. So I'm following my own advice."


Although The Best of Times has no features in the traditional sense, it does have an important co-star. "What makes this album really special to me is that I've done it with the help of my son, Amir Ali Said. Amir, who is the co-executive producer along with me, has been extremely instrumental — literally speaking — to this album. My son is living in Paris at the moment; I just recently returned to New York City from there. And we wanted a way to stay connected until I made my way back to Paris. So as a challenge, and a way for us to really stay connected, I asked him to dig in the crates — e-dig — and pick music for me to sample. No one knows my ear better than Amir. That's my son; he's on the cover of The BeatTips Manual. He's been hearing me make and talk about music his entire life. So I completely trust his judgment; I knew that he would send me stuff that I could catch wreck on. That's why Amir is the co-star of this album: He sent me handpicked music to flip, and I flipped it."


Coinciding with his album announcement, Sa'id dropped a new song called "Make It Mean Something." "I had to drop a new joint. I couldn't mention my new album and not drop a joint. So Here is 'Make It Mean Something,' the first song from my new album. Please share! And thank you for your continued support."


BeatTips has provided the most trusted information on the craft, culture, and business of beatmaking/hip hop production since 2002. The 1st edition of ‘The BeatTips Manual’ was published by Superchamp Books in 2002, the same year BeatTips.com was founded. Used by beatmakers and in schools around the world, in 2007, ‘The BeatTips Manual,’ now widely held as the standard for hip hop production education, was featured in New York University’s first course on beatmaking and hip hop production. Since then, ‘The BeatTips Manual,’ now in its 6th Edition, has been used in countless schools and institutions of higher learning, including The Berklee College of Music and the University of North Carolina (Chapel Hill), and it continues to be recognized as the definitive beatmaking/hip hop production book around the globe, confirming its status as one of the most important music studies of our time.


Press Contact: G. Ferguson, beattips2@gmail.com
http://www.BeatTips.com | @BeatTipsManual @AmirSaid

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January 10, 2011

Beatmaking Skills Prior to DAWs

Taking Short Breaks from Computer; Self-Imposed Refresher Course Helps Rejuvenate and Improve My Creativity

By AMIR SAID (SA'ID)

Every other week or so, I work on making new beats without the use of my computer. That is to say, without tracking my beat into Pro Tools, my DAW of choice.

What brought about this decision? Two things. First, I like to revisit the mind frame that I was once in, when I didn't have regular access to, or the convenience of, a computer. Second, and this is perhaps more important, I want my son, Amir Ali Said, to always view the computer as an aid, not necessarily a necessity, to his beatmaking skills.

My son, Amir (now 14), first began seriously watching me make beats when he was 4 years old. Back then, I didn't have a computer...I didn't even have a CD recorder. Nope. I had a cassette recorder, and that's what I used to record my beats to.

Looking back on that time, I realize how much I adjusted my beatmaking style to accommodate how I would be recording my beats. In fact, every new piece of gear that I added to my setup—that was supposed to improve my tracking (recording) process—actually prompted me to change how I made my beats. When I first got a mixing console, a 16-channel Mackie board, I changed up how I modified my bass lines. When I got my first CD recorder, I doubled the time I usually spent on "mixing" my beats. And, finally, when I first got Pro Tools, I tripled the time (if not more) that I spent on "mixing" my beats.

In the past 10 years, I've probably acquired five different mixing consoles, three different versions of Pro Tools and its hardware interfaces, four different CD recorders, and no less than seven pairs of speakers and monitors. And with each of these new acquisitions, I increased the time I spent tracking (recording) my beats, while at the same time, I decreased the time I spent actually making my beats.

Lately, this dilemma has been resonating much more. Particularly, because my son's understanding of, and interest in, beatmaking has grown dramatically—much more faster than it took me to understand certain things. So as Amir becomes more in tune with the art of beatmaking, I'm finding that some of the best things I have to teach him are the many things I learned prior to getting a mixing console, prior to getting a CD recorder, and prior to getting Pro Tools. And although I realize that's it's just plain practical to use a DAW, I specifically, think it's important for him to learn how to protect the imagination and creativity of his musicianship from an over reliance on particular music production tool.

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The BeatTips Manual by Sa'id.
"The most trusted source for information on beatmaking and hip hop/rap music education."

January 09, 2011

BeatTips MusicStudy: Charles Mann - "Say You Love Me Too"

Little Known Soul Singer Still Has Much To Show

By AMIR ALI SAID

The other night, right before I went to sleep, my father (Sa'id) started playing a series of soul songs. One song that stuck with me—that I wrote on my yellow pad—was Charles Mann's "Say You Love Me Too." The song starts off with three organ hits, and the background singers come in with the chorus. Behind them is a slow bass guitar riff, which is backed up by violin phrases, piano, and of course, drums. After the snare hits, Charles Mann begins to sing.

Listening to a little known artist like Charles Mann, I can't help but wonder how many other great soul artists there are who never hit it big. I'm surprised that Charles Mann didn't go on to have a bigger career. Listening to this song, you can easily see him rivaling other soul vocalists of his time.

The music and video below is presented here for the purpose of scholarship.

Charles Mann - "Say You Love Me Too"

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